Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘www.socialsecurity.gov’

Here’s the second installation (which includes parts 2 and 3 from the Social Security Administration blogger) of Social Security Benefits information that I hope you find helpful:

Step 2: Medical Qualification

 In addition to meeting the income and work-related requirements explained above, all applicants will have to meet certain medical requirements. These medical requirements are listed in the SSA’s guide of qualifying conditions, known as the Blue Book.  The Blue Book is broken into many different sections—each pertaining to a specific condition or group of conditions.

Spinal cord injuries are listed under section 1.04—Disorders of the Spine. The requirements of this listing are as follows:  Applicants must have an injury that causes compromise of a nerve root with:

  • Evidence of nerve root compression characterized by pain, limited motion of the spine, motor loss, and sensory or reflex loss; OR
  • Spinal arachnoiditis confirmed using appropriate medical records; OR
  • Lumbar spinal stenosis.

It is important that you review this listing in its entirety. If you do not understand the terminology used, it may be in your best interest to schedule an appointment with your doctor. He or she will be able to explain the criteria to you and can perform the tests necessary to prove your eligibility. If you do not meet this listing, you may be eligible for disability benefits under a medical vocational allowance. This means that the SSA will evaluate your functional abilities, your previous job training, and your age to determine whether or not you are capable of holding a job. If they determine that you cannot work, it is likely that your application for disability benefits will be approved.

Step 3: Preparing for the Application

You will need to prepare by for the application process by collecting the necessary medical and financial records to prove your eligibility. Without this information your claim may potentially be delayed or even denied. Medical records should include:

  • Documentation of your diagnosis
  • A history of hospitalizations and treatments
  • Medical images- X-ray, CT, MRI
  • Surgical reports
  • Written statements from any treating physicians

Non-medical documentation will include forms of identification, financial information, and employment records. To view a complete list of non-medical requirements, visit the SSA’s Adult Disability Interview Checklist.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »