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Posts Tagged ‘accessibility’

The Abilities Expo is today, tomorrow and Sunday (Friday, May 2 – Sunday, May 4) at the NJ Convention & Expo Center @ Raritan, 97 Sunfield Avenue, Edison, NJ 08837. Come visit us at Booth #808!

One of the reasons I love this Expo is because it truly does center on abilities. What people CAN do, what products can help them live life to the fullest. In addition to vendors with products and services, many nonprofits are there which provide valuable information, all kinds of accessible vehicles and lots of adapted sports equipment and activities.

There is also a full schedule of presentations in adjoining meeting rooms and a schedule of demonstrations like wheelchair dancing and quad rugby. The full schedule of events can be reviewed by clicking HERE.

Go and spend a few hours – I am sure you will find it worthwhile!

P.S. Don’t forget to keep voting EVERY DAY for Push to Walk to win a $25,000 State Farm Neighborhood Assist Grant. Click here to vote for us!

Thanks, and enjoy the weekend! Cynthia

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Happy Wednesday!

Yay, a day without snow! With record snowfalls in northern NJ this year, everyone I know is looking forward to spring. We all hate the shoveling, clearing our cars, and navigating through parking lots and sidewalks. But if you know  someone who uses a wheelchair or has difficulty walking, what an added element of difficulty snow adds to a daily routine.

As I make my way carefully over slippery surfaces, up and over snowbanks, or around obstacles to get where I’m going, I think about everyone who relies on their wheelchairs for mobility or have difficulty with balance and taking smooth steps. HOW do you do it? From very narrow walkways to uncleared access ramps, snowed-in parking spaces to icy surfaces – it can be a nightmare, I am sure. And how do you clear off your car, or dig out after being plowed in?

Other than moving to a warmer climate, what are your solutions and tips for others who might be facing similar situations? I’d love to hear your ideas, and pass them along to others!

Until the next snowstorm (although I know the snow we already have will cause problems for months), stay safe!

Cynthia

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New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has again designated September 2013 as Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month. This fits in nicely with the nationally recognized month, and will hopefully serve to educate, inform and advocate for all those people living with spinal cord injuries and paralysis.

One of my personal goals of SCI Awareness Month is to help people in general understand what spinal cord injuries really mean. Here’s a quote that sums it up:

“I don’t like it that media shows only “inspirational” people.  I want people to know what happens when there aren’t any accessible parking places left.  I want them to know about pressure sore issues, catheters, bowel concerns, pain, medications, the average income, assistance needed—the whole dark side.  I don’t want their pity.  I want them educated.  Only then can they understand the need for ADA compliance, rehab availability and medical research.”   —  Karen Miner, C4, Roseville, California

While there does seem to be more media coverage lately about SCI, and that is a good thing, (hopefully we contribute to that as well), there is a need for people to understand what the daily challenges are for a person with SCI. The things the able-bodied population (including me) take for granted every day. With our clients and interactions with family members, we hear what the realities are every single day. With persistence, determination and a will to move forward, people deal with and overcome these daily challenges, but as an outsider, we have no idea…….

The obvious challenges are physical mobility and lack of accessibility in still so many public places. Transportation challenges are high on the list: not being able to drive, affording an accessible vehicle, relying on drivers, even getting a vehicle repaired. All can disrupt a person’s schedule for days, even weeks. Usually the unspoken topic is bowel and bladder issues. When a daily routine of bowel movements is disrupted by any number of causes (diet, medication, anxiety, physical ailments or other unknown assailants) a person’s self confidence, dignity, and emotional well being are attacked along with schedule changes and missing work, school and exercise. When bowel and bladder accidents happen either at home or in public, even those who figure out ways of dealing with it can become frustrated, angry and upset.

Any little thing can trigger a downward spiral. Sometimes a person’s emotional state is so fragile, a “simple” disruption is anything but. I can list many more challenges that none of us really see when we see someone who uses a wheelchair. Please know they exist; just be aware. That’s one thing I hope SCI Awareness Month can help accomplish.

Thanks for reading! Cynthia

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Hello everyone,

Push to Walk has partnered with Helen Hayes Hospital in many ways over the last several years, and we are grateful to work with them in our joint mission of improving the quality of life for people with disabilities. They have a brand new “Smart Apartment” which incorporates a variety of cool technologies to improve independence. Check out the link below and attend their upcoming reception to see it for yourself! The RSVP date is TODAY!

Helen Hayes Hospital, Route 9W, West Haverstraw, NY

Thursday, April 18 from 5-7:30 PM

Join them for a ribbon-cutting ceremony, hors d’oeuvres and guided tours of the Smart Apartment.

Experience how the sound of a voice, the power of touch, the press of a button and the blink of an eye can inspire independence.

RSVP by April 12 by calling 845-786-4114 or email kurtzm@helenhayeshosp.org.

Check out this link for more information: http://www.hhhfoundation.net/smart-apartment/

Enjoy the weekend!

Cynthia

 

 

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I am an able-bodied person that spends a lot of waking hours around people in wheelchairs. At Push to Walk, most of our clients use wheelchairs for mobility, and while they may not be in their wheelchairs for the duration of their workouts, they come and go and converse with me while in their chairs. As much time as I spend around people in chairs, I do not have a clue what it takes to go through a day, every day, every week, every month, in a chair. While I have been prodded to spend a day in a wheelchair, and I have resisted (more about that in another blog post, I promise), I still don’t think that would help me understand the situation, although it would provide some insight.

In any case, here’s a good example of what those of us who walk around without a thought about the fact that we ARE walking, don’t think about.  And I’m sure there are a thousand other things as well. By the way, this is the father of a Push to Walk client.

Along this line of thought, there is a group called SCI Sucks that spells out what the public doesn’t realize about spinal cord injuries, and the messages often perpetuated by the disabled community itself. Their tagline says it all: “People tell us to change the name, but then we wouldn’t be telling the truth.”

Take a few minutes to think about ways you could improve just little things that could make a world of difference to someone who uses a wheelchair. It might just make someone smile, and make their day just a little easier.

Cynthia

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Happy Wednesday!

We are in the final countdown of days to Christmas, and perhaps some of you are planning to travel around the holidays. Air travel IS possible for people who use wheelchairs, and I would encourage you to not shy away from flying places that you might want to go to. Whether to visit family or friends, take a vacation or even a business trip, some advance planning and preparation are key to a succesful and enjoyable experience.

First, make sure you specify your needs when making your initial plans with the airline.

Second, allow PLENTY of time for all parts of the process: arrive early and allow extra time for going through security and getting to the gate. If you need assistance curbside, let the airline personnel know what you need. Once you’re at the gate, make sure the gate agents know you need an aisle chair or assistance. You’ll probably be the first passenger to board, so be ready!

Third, make sure you take all removable parts of your wheelchair onto the plane with you, and your seating cushion if you will use that on the plane. Make sure your chair is tagged and marked properly for any special care that needs to be taken. This is especially important for power chairs.

Fourth, always allow for delays! Make sure you have extra supplies for cathing and know how you will handle a situation if it arises. Delays are inevitable these days (or so it seems!), so being prepared is essential.

Finally, when you arrive at your destination, check your chair throughly to make sure it is not damaged, all parts are accounted for and it is safe to use. Don’t transfer into it until you are sure it is safe! If it is damaged, take pictures and document what has happened, and file a claim.

Air travel can be troublesome for everyone to some extent, and with added challenges of accessibility, accomodations, wheelchairs and extra supplies needed, you do need to plan accordingly if you have a disability of any sort that requires special attention. There was a story in the news recently about a 12 year old girl who uses a wheelchair being treated unfairly by the TSA. It happens, and it’s awful. My son was, I believe, unfairly targeted when flying out of Denver airport several years ago, and the commotion they caused and the way he was treated probably violated his rights as a person and a passenger. It’s a difficult situation, though, and while you may not deserve the treatment the TSA seems intent on imposing on you, it’s a very helpless feeling to be at their mercy. Try to document anything that seems ufair, and get names and badge numbers for follow-up later on.

I hope you enjoy traveling and go many wonderful places! Using a wheelchair may present additional challenges, but I hope they don’t prevent you from going anywhere you want to go!

A recent edition of Life in Action (Sept-Oct 2012) has some wonderful information on various travel activities and tips. Check it out!   http://www.spinalcord.org/getting-there/

Happy and safe travels! Cynthia

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Happy Friday! And congratulations to our NJ Devils for getting past the first round of the playoffs, for the first time in way too many years. Go Devils!!!

When my two children, Darren and Arianne, were younger, I dreamed about going away for several weeks in the summer and traveling in an RV to see the U.S. After a considerable amout of nagging, prodding and practically begging, my husband agreed. In the summer of 2000, we rented an RV and headed cross country. It would turn out to be 17 days and a lot of fun, for most of us – varying amounts of fun at varying times would probably be an apt description! All in all, it was a great trip and provided us with great experiences, family bonding and wonderful memories. I (of course!) loved it the most! I’d like to see more of the U.S. in an RV – hopefully we will do that in the future! To plan a trip like that (for me, anyway; lots of people can just go and do, which is fine) requires a fair amount of research and planning ahead. For people with disabilities and who use wheelchairs, the need to be prepared is multiplied many times over, and requires due diligence in some cases to make sure that traveling will be enjoyable, fun and not stressful. A Push to Walk client recently returned from a cruise with her family and had a wonderful time!

Here’s a website that will help all of us if we ever want to travel around the country in an RV. This site has so much valuable information and it is so well organized and sorted. I love it! Check it out! http://rollinginarv-wheelchairtraveling.blogspot.com/p/our-motorhome.html. The author presents the information in a very well-written format, as a wheelchair user and as a seasoned traveler.

There are lots of resources out there on accessible travel and helping people have fun while vacationing. Don’t let using a wheelchair limit the possibilities. If you want to go somewhere in particular or take a specific type of vacation – cruise, all inclusive resort, etc. – there are resources out there to help! Another great place for info is United Spinal’s “Able to Travel” program (www.abletotravel.org). Take advantage of the info, get out there and GO!!  Happy travels!!!

Cynthia

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